Clothes & Pizza

Fall Transition: Ukrainian Dressing

The Non-Knockoff Knockoff

When I stumbled up on this Vita Kin beauty via the blogosphere, I just about died. And then I saw its price tag and rolled over in my proverbial grave. After some light Internet sleuthing, I discovered that Vita is a Ukrainian designer and the dress patterning is a traditional Ukrainian embroidery style called Vyshyvanka. I found a Ukrainian dressmaker via Etsy who makes the same style of clothing, and scooped one right up. I’m normally anti-knockoff, but in this case, it doesn’t feel like a rip off because the Vita Kin dress isn’t actually an original design. Or at least that’s what my research has determined.

I love that the dress is tea length to show off my kicks. It’s a great transitional piece because I can easily throw on tights and boots for fall/winter. I’m even thinking of picking up another shorter version!

Inspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian Embroidery Inspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian Embroidery Inspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian Embroidery Inspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian Embroidery Inspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian EmbroideryInspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian EmbroideryInspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian EmbroideryInspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian EmbroideryInspired by Vita Kin and Traditional Ukrainian Embroidery

Dress: custom via Etsy  |  Bag: old, similar here  |  Shoes: BCBG, similar here  |  Sunnies: Asos  |  Jewelry: all vintage

7 Responses

  1. Sorry to disappoint you, but your research is incorrect.
    Traditionally, Ukrainian vyshyvankas are blouses, almost primarily white with red and black embroidery.
    The red dress you copied is uniquely Vita’s innovation and design.
    All of the sellers on Etsy are simply stealing Vita’s hard work.
    (Or have you found a lot of old photographs of Ukrainian villagers wearing this dress?)

    • Thanks for the heads up! I wish the wikipedia entry for vyshyvanka was more detailed, perhaps you could update it with your expert knowledge! Sadly I don’t have access to old photographs of Ukrainian villagers to confirm my initial research. Now that I know Vita Kin pieces are *not* in fact traditional Ukrainian designs, I promise to buy a genuine Vita Kin when I have an extra $3,000 laying around! Thank you so much for reading and have a blessed day!

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About Abby


Bay Area-based UX designer by day, clothes horse by night.

Say hello: clothesandpizza@gmail.com

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